A Tale of Two Cities

On LGBT issues, Virginia is right and left. by Julia O'Donoghue The approval of North Carolina’s same-sex marriage ban last spring upset ...

Empowering LGBT Scientists

LGBT people in science, technology, engineering and mathematics find community in their disciplines, even if they lack visibility. by Ian Coley Owen ...

A Level Playing Field

The Obama administration has pledged millions of dollars to LGBT community health centers that help a population at greater risk ...

Families Matter

How North Carolina’s conservative values jeopardize its LGBT community. by Kaitlyn Jakola Ashley Broadway and her partner have been together for 15 ...

A New Day for HIV

How stigma, fear and race affect HIV outcomes in young men who have sex with men. by Mac Irvine “Good morning!” Romel ...

Tuned In

Tuned In

Jorge Valdivia created a safe space for LGBT Latino youth through public radio.
by Jason Lederman

From The Ground Up

From The Ground Up

When it comes to educating people on LGBT issues, sometimes politicians don’t cut it.
by Julia Haskins

Finding the T

Finding the T

A trans woman comes into her identity through local activism.
by Julia Haskins

Beyond the DREAM

Beyond the DREAM

National groups fight for immigration rights for LGBT people.
by Gabe Bergado

Beyond Marriage Equality

Beyond Marriage Equality

As Illinois inches toward legalizing marriage equality, one activist says there’s more to do.
by Bo Suh

The Marriage Vote

The Marriage Vote

Maryland may break new ground if same-sex marriage wins at the ballot box.
by Julia O’Donoghue

Do No Harm

Do No Harm

The battle over therapy to change sexual orientation continues beyond California.
by Julia Haskins

Making Trans History

Making Trans History

Mel Wymore could become the first transgender person elected to the New York City Council.
by Edwin Rios

Florida: The Color Purple

Florida: The Color Purple

A gay law professor and politician discusses why Florida voters banned marriage equality the same year they elected Obama.
by Camille Beredjick

From the Editor

August 2013

A year ago, in the middle of a national presidential campaign, a group of students and faculty from the Medill School of Journalism stepped up to an invaluable opportunity and an immense challenge. As the Medill Equal Media Project, the first project of its kind at Northwestern or, as far as we know, any journalism school, we set out during the prime of election season to tell untold stories from lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) communities across the country. Weeks before the election, we shared those stories and built out a site, striving to examine the actual effects of the changing political climate on real people.

In assigning, reporting, and editing these stories, we reflected on how our own work fit into a greater media landscape, one in which the issues facing LGBT communities began to fill newsprint and newsfeeds more often than they ever have. As the terrain shifted beneath our feet, we adapted to new conditions.

Over the course of several months, our writers and editors pushed beyond their comfort zones to ask difficult questions in uncharted territory. Early on, students pushed back against a public challenge to their objectivity. We held an all-staff discussion about the differences between journalism as a form of activism versus our project, which was an effort to model more refined coverage of minority communities.

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© 2012 Medill Equal Media Project
Medill School of Journalism | Northwestern University
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